Non-fiction Catalogue: February 2018

All the books in this catalogue are new books due for release in February 2018.

Because they are new books, we are at the whim of the publishers and, to some extent, the shipping companies – books can sometimes arrive later (or earlier) than, or occasionally be a different retail price, than originally quoted. Because space is a luxury, we bring in limited quantities of books. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Please reserve copies of anything you want, so you don’t miss out – ASAP! If a book has sold out by the time we receive your order, we will back-order and supply, when available. Pulp Fiction has access to thousands of books not shown in our monthly catalogues. We are only too happy to order anything, if we don’t have it on the shelves.

If you can’t make it into the shop, you can post, phone, or e-mail your order. We accept Mastercard, Visa, AMEX, cheques, and Australia Post Money Orders. Approximate current postage, within Australia, is:

  • 1–2 paperbacks (up to 500g), $7.95
  • 2–10 paperbacks or any trade paperbacks or hardcovers, within Brisbane, is $10.70
  • outside Brisbane metro area (over 500g up to 3kg), $13.40
  • anything above 3kg charged at Australia Post rates.

Abbreviations used in this catalogue: PBK = ‘A’ or ‘B’ format (standard size) paperback;TP = ‘B+’ or ‘C’ format (oversize) trade paperback;HC = hardcover or cloth binding.

Until next time, good reading!

New Osprey military history titles

Roman Standards and Standard-Bearers (1): 112 BC–AD 192 (Elite 221)
D’Amato, Rafaele & Dennis, Peter (illustrator)
Roman unit standards played an important role, both ceremonially and on the battlefield. With the armies of the late Roman Republic and early Empire continually engaged on the frontiers, the soldiers selected for the dangerous honour of carrying them were figures of particular renown and splendour. Standard-bearers wore special armour, with the heads and pelts of animals such as bears, wolves, or even lions draped over their helmets and shoulders. The standards themselves varied greatly, from the legion’s Eagle and imperial portrait image to various cohort signa, flags (vexilla) and even dragon ‘windsocks’ (dracones) copied from barbarian enemies and allies. This first volume of a two-part series by Roman army expert, Rafaele D’Amato uses detailed colour plates and the latest research to examine these vital cogs in the Roman army machine that drove its soldiers to conquer the known world.
Military history | PBK | $22.99

Battle of Britain 1940: The Luftwaffe’s ‘Eagle Attack’ (Air Campaign)
Dildy, Doug & Turner, Graham (illustrator)
In August 1940, the Luftwaffe began an operation to destroy or neutralise RAF Fighter Command, and enable Hitler to invade Britain that autumn. It was a new type of air warfare: the first ever offensive counter-air campaign against an integrated air defence system. Powerful, combat-proven and previously all-conquering, the German air force had the means to win the Battle of Britain. Yet, it did not. This book is an original, rigorous campaign study of the Luftwaffe’s Operation Adlerangriff, researched in Germany’s World War II archives and using the most accurate data available. Doug Dildy explains the capabilities of both sides, sets the campaign in context, and argues persuasively that it was the Luftwaffe’s own mistakes and failures that led to its defeat, and kept alive the Allies’ chance to ultimately defeat Nazi Germany.
Aviation/military history | PBK | $27.99

Sagger Anti-Tank Missile vs M60 Main Battle Tank: Yom Kippur War 1973 (Duel 84)
McNab, Chris; Shumate, Johnny (illustrator) & Gilliland, Alan (illustrator)
The 1973 Yom Kippur War rewrote the textbook on the tactics of modern armoured warfare. Unlike the previous major Arab-Israeli war of 1967, the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) faced an enemy that had invested heavily in modern Soviet weapon systems and tactics. Using detailed colour artwork and insightful analysis, this book explains how the effective use of the Soviet-supplied AT-3 Sagger (9M14 Malyutka) anti-tank missile allowed small Arab tank-killing teams to destroy Israeli armour at an astonishing rate. It also analyses the tank that opposed it, the US-built M60A1, which had to fight for survival against the Arab Saggers, and shows how in both the Sinai and the Golan Heights, the IDF quickly learned that firepower and infantry/artillery cooperation were the keys to their survival.
Military history | PBK | $24.99

Rabaul 1943–44: Reducing Japan’s great island fortress (Air Campaign)
Lardas, Mark & Postlethwaite, Mark (illustrator)
In 1942, the massive Japanese naval base and airfield at Rabaul was a fortress standing in the Allies’ path to Tokyo. It was impossible to seize Rabaul, or starve the 100,000-strong garrison out. Instead the US began an innovative, hard-fought two-year air campaign to draw its teeth, and allow them to bypass the island completely. The struggle decided more than the fate of Rabaul. If successful, the Allies would demonstrate a new form of warfare, where air power, with a judicious use of naval and land forces, would eliminate the need to occupy a ground objective in order to control it. As it turned out, the Siege of Rabaul proved to be more just than a successful demonstration of air power – it provided the roadmap for the rest of World War II in the Pacific.
Aviation/military history | PBK | $23.99



The Shaping of Us: How Everyday Spaces Structure our Lives, Behaviour, and Wellbeing
Bernheimer, Lily
What makes everyday spaces work, how do they shape us, and what do they say about us? The spaces we live in – whether public areas, housing, offices, hospitals, or cities – mediate community, creativity, and our very identity, making us who we are. Using insights from environmental psychology, design, and architecture, The Shaping of Us reveals the often imperceptible ways in which our surroundings influence our behaviour. Wide-ranging and global examples cover the differences between personalities and nationalities, explore grass-roots and mainstream efforts to build environments promoting wellbeing, and look ahead to what will become of us if we don’t listen closely to what we know is good for us. You will learn whether you are a natural ‘prospector’ or ‘refuger’ in the office environment, what roundabouts and stoplights say about British and American culture, whether you are guilty of NIMBYism or being drawn to ‘ruin porn’, and how the half-house may be a common sight in the near future. The environments we inhabit define our identities – from the earliest moments of our evolution to the worlds we build around ourselves.
Science | TP | $32.99

The Story of Sex: From Apes to Robots (graphic novel format)
Brenot, Philippe & Coryn, Laetitia
Sex is everywhere, yet how many of us truly understand it? Our attitudes to sex and sexuality are forever in flux. Driven by pleasure, power, revenge, a desire for children or simply because it isn’t allowed, humans have had sex on the brain since pre-civilisation. But what do we really know? In The Story of Sex, we discover the truth, including: what eroticism really is, when the first couple was established, what phallic festivals were all about, when chastity belts were used and how some ancient civilisations were far ahead of their time when it came to gender equality. The first graphic novel of its kind, The Story of Sex brilliantly and humorously uncovers the most fascinating details of our sexual ancestry, and foretells a future of virtual gratification.
Society and culture | PBK | $29.99

This Idea Is Brilliant: Lost, Overlooked, and Underappreciated Scientific Concepts Everyone Should Know
Brockman, John
The latest volume in the bestselling series from – dubbed ‘the world’s smartest website’ by The Guardian – brings together 206 of the world’s most innovative thinkers to discuss the scientific concepts that everyone should know. As science informs public policy, decision making, and so many aspects of our everyday lives, a scientifically-literate society is crucial. In that spirit, publisher and author of Know This, John Brockman, asks 206 of the world’s most brilliant minds the 2017 Edge Question: What scientific term or concept ought to be more widely known?
Science | TP | $32.99

The Written World and the Unwritten World
Calvino, Italo
A true celebration of literature in its many forms, The Written World and the Unwritten World brings together essays, articles, interviews, forewords and notes from the inimitable mind of Italo Calvino. The fate of the novel, reading and translation are just some of the subjects examined in this remarkable work offering an exceptionally global account of literature and its standing in a rapidly changing world.
Literature: History and criticism | PBK | $24.99

Directorate S: The CIA and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan, 2001–2016
Coll, Steve
In the wake of the terrible shock of 9/11, the CIA scrambled to work out how to destroy Bin Laden and his associates. The CIA had long familiarity with Afghanistan and had worked closely with the Taliban to defeat the Soviet Union there. A tangle of assumptions, old contacts, favours and animosities were now reactivated. Superficially the invasion was quick and efficient, but Bin Laden’s successful escape, together with that of much of the Taliban leadership, and a catastrophic failure to define the limits of NATO’s mission in a tough, impoverished country the size of Texas, created a quagmire which lasted many years. At the heart of the problem lay ‘Directorate S’, a highly-secretive arm of the Pakistan state which had its own views on the Taliban and Afghanistan’s place in a wider competition for influence between Pakistan, India and China, and which assumed that the USA and its allies would soon be leaving. Steve Coll’s remarkable new book tells a powerful, bitter story of just how badly foreign policy decisions can go wrong and of many lives lost.
Espionage/society and culture | TP | $35.00

From Bacteria to Bach and Back
Dennett, Daniel C
What is human consciousness and how is it possible? These questions fascinate thinking people from poets and painters to physicists, psychologists, and philosophers. This is Daniel C Dennett’s brilliant answer, extending perspectives from his earlier work in surprising directions, exploring the deep interactions of evolution, brains, and human culture. Part philosophical whodunnit, part bold scientific conjecture, this landmark work enlarges themes that have sustained Dennett’s legendary career at the forefront of philosophical thought. In his inimitable style, laced with wit and arresting thought experiments, Dennett shows how culture enables reflection by installing a profusion of thinking tools, or memes, in our brains. Language, itself composed of memes, turbocharged this interplay. The result, a mind that can comprehend the questions it poses, emerges from a process of cultural evolution. An agenda-setting book for a new generation of philosophers and other researchers, this will delight and entertain anyone who hopes to understand human creativity in all its wondrous applications.
Science/society and culture | PBK | $24.99

Metaphors Be With You: An A to Z Dictionary of History’s Greatest Metaphorical Quotations
Grothe, Mardy
Essential for writers, readers, and language aficionados, this breathtaking, beautifully designed sourcebook also contains elegantly integrated digital access to Dr Mardy’s Dictionary of Metaphorical Quotations, the world’s largest online database of quotations containing metaphors, similes, and analogies. This one-of-a-kind synergy between print and technology offers a comprehensive look at the diversity of words and phrases we use to relate to, understand, and describe our world by providing access to detailed source information, innumerable ‘Error Alerts’, and fascinating quotation backstories that will engage readers as they delve into metaphorical language and discover their own favourites. Whether you’re crafting a speech, writing a novel, or simply searching for new ways to express yourself, this remarkable compendium is sure to inspire you with the perfect metaphor every time.
English usage | PBK | $24.99

The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France’s Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando
Kix, Paul
A scion of one of the oldest families in France, Robert de La Rochefoucauld was raised in a magnificent chateau and educated in Europe’s finest schools. When the Nazis invaded and imprisoned his father, La Rochefoucauld escaped to England and was trained in the dark arts of anarchy and combat – cracking safes, planting bombs and killing with his bare hands – by a collection of SOE spies. With his newfound skills, La Rochefoucauld returned to France and organised Resistance cells, blew up fortified compounds and munitions factories, interfered with Germany’s wartime missions and executed Nazi officers. Caught by the Germans, La Rochefoucauld withstood months of torture and escaped his own death sentence, not once but twice. More than just a fast-paced, real-life thriller, The Saboteur is also a deep dive into an endlessly fascinating historical moment, revealing the previously untold story of a network of commandos, motivated by a shared hatred of the Nazis, who battled evil and bravely worked to change the course of history.
Military history/espionage | TP | $32.99

100 Million Years of Food: What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today
Le, Stephen
There are few areas of modern life that offer as much information and advice, often contradictory, as diet and health: eat a lot of meat, don’t eat meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; and on it goes. Biological anthropologist Stephen Le cuts through the confusing mass of information to present the long view of our diet. In 100 Million Years of Food, Le takes readers on an historic and geographic tour of how different cuisines have evolved in tandem with their particular environments, as our ancestors took advantage of the resources and food available to them. Like his mentor Jared Diamond, Le uses history and science to present a fascinating and wide-ranging tour of human history as viewed through what and how we eat. Travelling the world to places as far-flung as Vietnam, Kenya, Nova Scotia, and Iowa, Le visits people producing food using traditional methods as well as modern techniques, and looks at how our relationship to food has strayed from centuries of tradition, to mass-produced assembly lines dependent on chemicals that bring with them a host of problems. 100 Million Years of Food argues that our ancestral diets and lifestyles are the best first line of defence in protecting our health; the optimal diet is to eat what your ancestors ate. In this clear-cut and compelling book, we learn not only what to eat, but how our diets are the product of millions of years of evolution.
Agriculture/diet/culture | TP | $24.99

How to Break Up With Your Phone
Price, Catherine
Recent studies have shown that spending extended time on our phones affects our ability to form new memories, think deeply, focus and absorb information, and the hormones triggered every time we hear our phones buzz both add to our stress levels and are the hallmark signs of addiction. In How to Break Up With Your Phone, award-winning science journalist Catherine Price explores the effects that our constant connectivity is having on our brains, bodies, relationships, and society at large and asks, how much time do you really want to spend on your phone? Over the course of 30 days, Catherine will guide you through an easy-to-follow plan that enables you to identify your goals, priorities and bad habits, tidy your apps, prune your email, and take time away. Lastly, you will create a new, healthier relationship with your phone and establish habits and routines to ensure this new relationship sticks. You don’t have to give up your phone forever; instead you will be more mindful not only of how you use your phone, but also about how you choose to spend the precious moments of your life.
Personal development | HC | $27.99

Darwin Comes to Town: How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution
Schilthuizen, Menno
We are marching towards a future in which three-quarters of humans live in cities, more than half of the landmass of the planet is urbanised, and the rest is covered by farms, pasture, and plantations. Increasingly, as we become ever more city centric, species and ecosystems crafted by millions of years of evolution teeter on the brink of extinction – or have already disappeared. A growing band of ‘urban ecologists’ is beginning to realise that natural selection is not so easily stopped. They are finding that more and more plants and animals are adopting new ways of living in the seemingly hostile environments of asphalt and steel that we humans have created. Carrion crows in the Japanese city of Sendai, for example, have learned to use passing traffic to crack nuts for them; otters and bobcats, no longer persecuted by humans, are waiting at the New York City gates; superb fairy-wrens in Australia have evolved different mating structures for nesting in strips of vegetation along roads; while distinct populations of London underground mosquitoes have been fashioned by the varied tube line environments. Menno Schilthuizen shows us that evolution can happen far more rapidly than Darwin had dared dream.
Evolution | TP | $29.99

Breaking the Chains of Gravity: The Story of Spaceflight before NASA
Teitel, Amy Shira
NASA’s history is a familiar story, one that typically peaks with Neil Armstrong taking his small step on the Moon in 1969. But America’s space agency wasn’t created in a vacuum. It was assembled from pre-existing parts, drawing together some of the best minds the non-Soviet world had to offer. In the 1930s, rockets were all the rage in Germany, the focus both of scientists hoping to fly into space and of the German armed forces, looking to circumvent the restrictions of the Treaty of Versailles. One of the key figures in this period was Wernher von Braun, an engineer who designed the rockets that became the devastating V-2. As the war came to its chaotic conclusion, von Braun escaped from the ruins of Nazi Germany, and was taken to America where he began developing missiles for the US Army. Meanwhile, the US Air Force was looking ahead to a time when men would fly in space, and test pilots like Neil Armstrong were flying cutting-edge, rocket-powered aircraft in the thin upper atmosphere. Breaking the Chains of Gravity tells the story of America’s nascent space program, its scientific advances, its personalities and the rivalries it caused between the various arms of the US military. At this point getting a man in space became a national imperative, leading to the creation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, otherwise known as NASA.
Science | PBK | $19.99